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j a n u a r y 2 0 1 6 A L I V E E A S T B A Y 21 Watson, and the owner of the Kansas City Chiefs, Clark Hunt. More football luminaries, yet to be announced at the time of this writing, will come from the ranks of other NFL teams, athletes, and coaches, supporting the AIA’s 2016 Super Bowl 50 Breakfast this year. Last year’s recipient of the Bart Starr Award was the newly crowned, NFL’s all-time leading passer, multiple All-Pro Super Bowl XLI Champion and current quarterback for the Denver Broncos, Peyton Manning. The honor roll of past recipients is star-studded, with its “Who’s Who” list of NFL greats. Included is Seattle Seahawks receiver Steve Largent, the initial Bart Starr Award recipient; NFL Hall of Fame offensive tackle Anthony Munoz; the Green Bay Packers revered “Minister of Defense,” the late Reggie White, as well as quarterbacks Kurt Warner, Trent Dilfer, Drew Brees, Aaron Rodgers, and Warren Moon. When the Athletes in Action roundtable leadership made its decision to create an award to honor a current NFL player who best exemplified their representative Christian faith-filled qualities of committed beliefs that forged its organization’s foundation, they felt there was but one man whose name should grace their prestigious award— Bart Starr. AIA approached the former Super Bowl Champion and NFL Hall of Fame quarterback of the Green Bay Packers, and quite humbly, Bart agreed to lend his name to the award. The fit, with its catch-phrase cliché, was indeed, “a match made in heaven.” Starr’s legacy of accomplishment, along with his off the field servant’s heart, exemplifies the standard for the AIA’s Bart Starr Award. Bart Starr was elected into the NFL and Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1977, following his brilliantly forged 16-year career as the Packers quarterback. Four years later, in 1981, he would be enshrined in the Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame. During his tenure as the Packer’s signal caller he played in six pro bowls and led his team to five world championships; was honored as the Most Valuable Player in Super Bowls’ I and II; tabbed as the NFL’s MVP in 1966 and selected as the NFL Man of the Year in 1969. He is one of six players from the Green Bay Packers to have his number—15—retired.


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